I KINGS

Home » » I KINGS I KINGS

 

 

I KINGS 2
Verse 1 That is what they do when it comes time for people to die. They call the son or next of kin, the heir. They commit to him certain things.
Verse 2 ‘…shew thyself a man.’ This phrase means ‘act like a man.’
Verse 4 That means you won’t lack anybody. You’ll always have a king on the throne of Israel. In the second verse, he tells him to be a man; third, how to behave before God; fourth, with the ending of blood.
Verse 5 Putting the blood on the girdle and feet is symbolic of the man who is in war who has killed his enemies in the war. It is symbolic of heroism.
Verse 6 This verse should read: ‘Kill him so his head will go to the grave like one who has been murdered.’
Verse 7 David tells Solomon who to be kind to.
Verse 19 The king’s mother sat on his right hand—the place of honor and power.
Verse 25 This verse should read: ‘And King Solomon sent Benaiah, the son of Jehoiada, with orders;
and he fell upon him that he died.’
Verse 28 In the altar there are horns of rams. The horns are symbolic of deliverance. They are kept on the altar. When he caught hold, it was symbolic of begging pardon from God.
Verse 29 ‘Go, fall upon him’ means ‘go kill him.’
 

I KINGS 7
Verse 23 ‘Molten’ means melted. Brass is used very much in the temples and homes in the East.
Copper is also used. ‘Molten sea’ means they made a swimming pool with copper all round. Instead of a wall, they put copper. Copper is used very frequently in the temples and home; therefore, they made this pool, not for swimming, but a large one that looks like a sea. Symbolically speaking they say big as a sea, but it isn’t. That is what they call ceremonial water. You can’t bathe in it. They take the water and wash their feet outside. People come and drink the water and the priest uses this water to bathe in also. It is
called sea because of its size and because it is made of melted brass. It is called molten. It is about 7 feet deep and full of water. The brass around the outside is beautiful to look at. They use it to cook with inside the temple. Any water that is inside the temple is clean and blessed. It is kept in the temple courtyard. When people leave at the end of a pilgrimage, they might take a goatskin full of water from it and say to the people that is the water they got from the people. Refer to II Chronicles 4:2-5.
 

I KINGS 10
Verses 10-12 Bring gift. To king: gold; to priest: fruit.
Bearing gifts, almug tree, sandalwood.
Queen of Sheba brought all of these gifts with her because she is visiting a king. 120 talents are worth about 24,000 pounds—$18,450 talent is equal to $2,234,000.
Almug tree—sandalwood tree. A wood of perfume, a perfume tree, used for pillars in the temple, with its wonderful sweet smell. There is a paste made from the sop and put on the forehead. This is a symbol of God’s favor to the Oriental (native to India, Palestine, Burma, Salon, etc.). When a person is cremated in the East, they put sandalwood on the fire or burn the air to sweeten the odor. They used the wood for all these things in verse 12.
Verses 11 and 12 Almug, sandalwood. Almug trees, algum trees, are called sandalwood trees. It is plentiful in the East. They make pillars and perfume from sandalwood trees. Musical instruments are made from sandalwood also. Emphasis not on hardness, but on its sweet smell.
Verse 22 (11:1,2.) Apes and peacocks.
Tharshish was in South India where apes and peacocks were plenteous. Apes were well trained to be palace guards. Better than men. They were symbolic of trustworthy protection. Peacocks were symbolic of continued prosperity and fortune. They believed that when peacocks walked the palace grounds, there would never be lack in the kingdom. If a person goes to temple, the priest touches his head with peacock feathers to bless him.
Solomon followed the practice because all the other kings were doing it. It was the first step in his downfall. God had given Solomon all of the wealth that he had which was more than any other king had or ever would have. He also bestowed on Solomon abundant wisdom. He should have trusted God for continued prosperity and protection. Instead, Solomon leaned to his own wisdom and followed the worldly method of trusting in apes and peacocks. His second step down was his love for many strange women, even though God warned him against this. We, like Solomon, do not need to trust in the arm of flesh for anything. Our sufficiency is in God who satisfies, heals and supplies every need. As we trust in God, He can open a way where there is no way. Worry is an insult to God. He never fails us, we fail Him. Men get tripped out by trying to follow one another instead of God. It is not our business how God is going to make a way for us. It is our business to trust Him. Then reap peace.
‘Apes and peacocks.’ Apes are trained to guard the palaces of the kings in those days, they are better guards than men.
Peacock is symbolic of prosperity, the priest would touch the man’s head with peacock feathers in order to bless him. Presence of the peacock or his feathers is symbolic of continuing prosperity. The blessing given by touching someone with the feather is for continuing prosperity.
This is the first step of Solomon’s downfall. He asked for wisdom and God gave it along with abundant material blessings.
Idiom—’This man is after apes and peacocks’ means he is putting his confidence in these rather than God. He is not putting trust in God.
Apes and peacocks. (Tharshish was south India.) Apes were trained to guard the palaces in the East.
Better than humans. Did not go to sleep. Eastern monarchs put trust in integrity of the apes for guardmen.
Peacocks were a symbol of continued prosperity. Apes—defense, peacocks—fortune.
Solomon wanted to be like these Eastern monarchs. Solomon took his eyes off God and put them on pagan ideas. It was his downfall. He had been blessed with prosperity beyond any other king, but now he lost it. His second downfall was strange women.
‘Nay of Tharshish.’ Tharshish is in South India where apes and peacocks are plentiful. Solomon used to trade with Tharshish once every three years.
Apes were trained to guard the palaces. They would not go to sleep.
Peacocks were a symbol of continued prosperity. ‘Apes for defence, peacocks for fortune.’
(II Chronicles 9:21.) Peacocks. (See I Kings 10:22.) The ships of Solomon went to Tarsus of India (where peacocks originate). Why did Solomon get the ivory, gold, silver? As decoration and wealth.
Why did he get apes and peacocks? The apes and peacocks were obtained because apes were guardsmen and were considered more trustworthy than men. The peacocks represent continued wealth. Wealth that can never be deleted while the peacocks are living. The first step toward the downfall of Solomon.
Solomon put his confidence in apes and peacocks rather than the living God. He wanted to follow steps of other kings rather than God. After this, Solomon lost his kingdom as he began with all of the wives.
Verses 22-29 (I Kings 11:1-4) King Solomon—’Outlandish women’ caused him to sin. But they were not his first step to downfall. See a complete set of notes on ”apes and peacocks’ for more information on Solomon and his fall. Solomon was first drawn off by the riches of materialism. Then his many wives were the completion of his downfall because they turned his heart away unto their gods (I Kings 11:1-4).
I Kings 10:22. Tharshish is in India. Because it was a mark of prestige in his time, Solomon sent to Tharshish for apes and peacocks. Rather than relying on God for protection, he relied on the apes to guard the palace. Peacocks were symbolic of continued wealth. The spread feathers symbolized the presence of God and the wealth would not diminish as long as feathers were spread. In every Hindu home there is a peacock feather and on the door is a swastika which symbolized good fortune. (The
Germans later adopted this sign for their own purposes.) Riches follow wisdom. Solomon took his downfall when he took his eyes off God and placed his confidence in riches. His downfall began with apes and peacocks. Unbelief always begins in a small way.
 

I KINGS 11
Verse 1 ‘Strange women.’ This is his next step down. The story of Solomon’s downfall goes from I Kings 10:21 to 11:6.
Verses 1 and 2 (10:22) Apes and peacocks. Tharshish was in South India where apes and peacocks were plenteous. Apes were well trained to be palace guards. Better than men. They were symbolic of trustworthy protection. Peacocks were symbolic of continued prosperity and fortune. They believed that when peacocks walked the palace grounds, there would never be lack in the kingdom. If a person goes to temple, the priest touches his head with peacock feathers to bless him.
Solomon followed the practice because all the other kings were doing it. It was the first step in his downfall. God had given Solomon all of the wealth that he had—which was more than any other king had or ever would have. He also bestowed on Solomon abundant wisdom. He should have trusted God for continued prosperity and protection. Instead, Solomon leaned to his own wisdom and followed the worldly method of trusting in apes and peacocks. His second step down was his love for many strange women, even though God warned him against this. We, like Solomon, do not need to trust in the arm of flesh for anything. Our sufficiency is in God who satisfies, heals and supplies every need. As we trust in God, He can open a way where there is no way. Worry is an insult to God. He never fails us. We fail Him. Men get tripped out by trying to follow one another, instead of God. It is not our business how God is going to make a way for us. It is our business to trust Him. Then reap peace.
Verses 1-4 King Solomon—’outlandish women’ caused him to sin. But they were not his first step to downfall. See I Kings 10:22-29. See also a complete set of notes on ‘apes and peacocks’ for more information on Solomon and his fall. Solomon was first drawn off by the riches of materialism. Then his many wives were the completion of his downfall because they turned his heart away unto their gods (I Kings 11:1-4).
(I Kings 10:22.) Tharshish is in India. Because it was a mark of prestige in his time, Solomon sent to Tharshish for apes and peacocks. Rather than relying on God for protection, he relied on the apes to guard the palace. Peacocks were symbolic of continued wealth. The spread feathers symbolized the presence of God and the wealth would not diminish as long as feathers were spread. In every Hindu home there is a peacock feather and on the door is a swastika which symbolizes good fortune. (The
Germans later adopted this sign for their own purposes.) Riches follow wisdom. Solomon took his downfall when he took his eyes off God and placed his confidence in riches. His downfall began with apes and peacocks. Unbelief always begins in a small way.
 

I KINGS 13
Verses 1-29 Oak tree. Jeroboam, the wicked king wanted to burn incense. He burned it and lost his hand because only Levites were to burn incense. He asked the man of God to restore his hand and he did.
Then Jeroboam asked the man of God to go home with him to eat bread. If he eats salt with the wicked king, he becomes equal with him…he must be truthful and loyal to him. God told the man of God NOT to eat with Jeroboam because he did not want His man to become one with the wicked king. The old prophet in Bethel lied to the prophet of Jeroboam. The Lord always touches us.
Verse 14: ‘Sitting under the oak tree.’ Oak tree always represents the presence of God. Juniper tree is a symbolism of defeat and frustration. (Green bay tree, Psalm 37:35—no such tree. Any kind of tree which grows quickly in its own soil is such a tree. Any man who prospers quickly in his own business is referred to as a ‘green bay tree.’ ‘Oh, he’s under the juniper tree’ means, as a figure of speech, he is defeated and frustrated. Should not be in agreement with the wicked. God then sent a lion to slay his disobedient servant. We today, choose to suffer ourselves. People today are wicked more than any other
period. Why?
Verse 4 The Oriental has to prove you can’t raise up your hand against the man of God. You can’t say any word against the man of God and whatever you show, that will dry up.
Verse 14 The oak tree in the Eastern countries is symbolic of God’s eternal presence. (Judges 6:11,19;
Joshua 24:26.) Some of the rich people are buried (I Chronicles 10:12; Genesis 35:3) under an oak tree.
If you are going to take a long journey, you begin under the oak tree. When the priests take a journey, they sleep under the oak tree, because they believe God is present under the tree. A man of God would not go to other people’s houses to eat or drink. A man of God must lead a separated life.
 

I KINGS 14
Verses 1-3 Gift, eating. As soon as the child fell sick, Jeroboam sent his wife to the man of God. She takes ten pancakes of bread, cracknels (like wider, thinner, hole in the middle: doughnuts, Sanskrit—paniyaram), and a cruise of honey to Ahijah the prophet. In the East, one cannot visit a man of God without a gift. Every time one must carry something.
Verse 3 ‘Loaves’ are loaves of bread. Their bread is like our pancakes. Cracknels are fruit and sweetness. It is specially offered to God on special festival days. It should be ‘bottle of honey.’ She took those things because they cannot go to the man of God empty handed.
Verse 4 ‘Set’ should be ‘dimmed.’
Verses 22 and 23 High places; graves; green tree. ‘High places’ are altars, for a pagan god for idol worship. ‘Graves’ are 2,3,4,5 high trees put together. In the middle is an altar on a high place. ‘Every high hill’ has a temple built on it. ‘Every green tree’ (Luke 23:31)—a species of a banyan tree whose characteristic is that the branches produce roots from each branch. Called the heavenly tree. Calcutta has a three-mile circumference tree. They raise up a high place inside of the green or heavenly tree and build an altar ( Luke 23:26-31; Isaiah 7:15; Jeremiah 3:6-9). Pagan people worshipped pagan gods in these areas.
 

I KINGS 17
verse 10 Gathering of sticks should be grass of the field. They use it for fire. It’s really a kind of shrub.
Anybody can ask for water, no matter who you are.
See John 4:16-18,28.
‘Fetch me I pray thee a little water….’ Asked for food at same time. Time of day: In East, draw water at anytime during the day that it is needed. This woman was at Jacob’s well in town. Lepers, prostitutes, and those who cared for pigs had to live outside town, and not permitted to come to town well.
Also, the prostitute is excommunicated by the people of the community to try and stop them from sinning and to give it up. If they come to well, can be cast out and stoned to death.
Elijah and woman gathering sticks. Asked her for water first, then spoke to her. Disciples marvelled that Jesus talked to woman and not because she was a sinner, because Jesus came to save sinners!
In East, go to well at all times of the day, not just morning. Jacob’s well—if woman living in sin, she is really excommunicated from the community. Both parties are urged to discontinue, if they don’t, forced to live out near the pigs. Can’t get food, clothes washed, etc. Wouldn’t be allowed to draw water at the well. Left her water pot—and went and talked to men, not women—she was a respected, religious woman, people came on her testimony.
Preaching here, we focus always on the negatives aspects, also on prodigal son. Leaving her water pot is significant; must not ever leave at well. Pot is symbolic of human being leaving pot…forsaking the Body. In East, believe spirit of God dwelling in everybody. Pot is inexpensive, but if broken, collect all the pieces, called the potsherd, because like the body, must use for the good of mankind. Big pieces placed near well for drinking; used to carry fire from place to place.
Verses 10 and 11 Elijah and widow—Elijah first asked for water and then food.
Marvelled because of the continued conversation in public thoroughfare after asking for water. Also, the Samaritans were outcasts to the Jews. So did not marvel because she was a bad character or prostitute. On the contrary, she was of a good, strong, moral character. In East, lepers, pigs, liquor shops and prostitutes must be about three miles out of town. Any woman living in sin, the whole town comes out—kicks her—and tosses her out of town. Do the same with people who are drunk; warn him and if continues, he also is cast out. Put them out of the city by telling merchants not to sell goods to them (barber, butcher, baker), nor are they allowed to draw water from the well. In East, nip things in the bud, fewer jails. Prostitutes, outcasts, untouchables and lepers were not allowed to come to the public well. Had to drink water from streams and lakes where pigs and water
buffalo drank.
The woman was a scholar and philosopher. She knew about the Messiah’s coming. Also left and talked to the men of the city. She had to be respected for that to happen. (Robes) white is the harvest; the men coming from town.
Water pot: sentimental, sacramental item. Cost at 8-10¢; no monetary value.
Attach divinity to East. Brings water to quench the thirst of people, just as we are containers for the Holy Spirit, and we are also earthen vessels. Pot is similar to us. Pot seen the same way.
If pot breaks, gather all the pieces. Must never leave pot at well under any circumstances, you will be ostracized if you do—forsaking God Almighty symbolically by pot. Evil spoken of the rest of her life—say that she is no good because she has forsaken God. When breaks—gather and bring pieces home. Each broken piece useful for good of mankind.
(Reference to Isaiah 30:14). Uses of broken potsherd: Big pieces placed near well or lake so people can drink from them. Smaller pieces are used to carry coals from house to house. Smaller pieces—rub and scratch itches on boils, as they believe there is a healing chemical in piece.
Job used ‘potsherd to scrape himself.’
Three kinds of vessels: Vessel of honor—used to wash feet of people who are going to pray; Vessel, clean—water to drink.
Spiritual meaning: the woman, when she came into contact with Jesus face to face, she was so overjoyed that she could not keep it to herself. She was willing to be ostracized by leaving her water pot. Too important, she had to go quickly and tell the men in the city. She didn’t care what people would tell against her. Where Christ is, consequences do not exist, and if they do exist, they don’t matter. When Christ is here, he comes first. Should put everything aside for Christ. Christ puts life and light in us. Should be able to give up everything and anything for the salvation of mankind. Should be enthusiastic
and anxious to tell and share what you know, when salvation is real and it is in your heart, not just your mind. Do anything in order that Christ might be glorified.
This woman left and told about Christ without being told because her joy was abundant. Her thrill was so great, wouldn’t miss the opportunity of telling others. Wanted others to have the same thing, and many others believed because of this woman. They themselves came to see.
Can give explanation of Word of God if you know the culture behind it. Woman took Jesus for a Jew—he wanted to prove to her that he was the Messiah. Would not have worked for him just to come out and say it. Have to show and prove it to her in a way Oriental mind would understand Holy men can tell people about themselves and their lives. When Jesus told her about her five husbands, she immediately perceived that he was a prophet.
Message: If you know that you are truly saved and have the peace of God that passeth all
understanding, that you have passed from death unto life everlasting, that Christ lives in you—the hope of glory, that you’re no longer you, but that Christ liveth in you, that you’re feasting on His Word and getting assurances, then you will rejoice, pray and thank Him, because you didn’t have all this before Christ.
With this knowledge and joy, then can’t keep quiet about Christ. If have something to say, you will break all traditions, will break all culture, rules and regulations that are man made, or concerned about public opinion. Because of God, can’t see the consequences. If thy eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light. Generally more concerned with public opinion. Tell people what you are saved from and what a difference it made. Give up everything and anything for Christ. You are set free. Be concerned with Christ and forget the crises.
A woman, widow of Jarephath, gathering sticks; she had one son and there was a famine
approaching. She was in the field gathering two sticks and a complete stranger, Elijah, approaches and asks for water. He then called and said, ‘Bake me something to eat, too.’ Had she gone and gotten the water and returned, Elijah could not have spoken to her in this area again. If one wishes to speak to a woman in the East, ask her for water.
Verses 10-16 Giving. A law of God works at all times. ‘Two’ means ‘some’—some sticks. Elijah asked her for water (verse 10) which is the only thing permissible for a man to ask a woman on the street.
Giving a cup of cold water to someone was the same as giving it to God. No matter what class a woman is, she is bound to get the water for someone who asks because she is giving it to God. The woman also gave of her last food during the famine because she was taught to seek the kingdom of God first, which meant she placed others before herself. She knew God would bless her giving. Her food was multiplied back to her daily because she gave.
Verse 12 A few sticks it should be, instead of two sticks. Anyone in the East will let themselves and their children starve if a man of God asks for food. There are a lot of imposters in India who are not really men of God, but say they are.
There was going to be a famine—a woman went to her pantry and found little food left. This would be her last meal and there was only enough oil in the cruse and enough meal to make a loaf of bread.
Bread in the East is called ‘shappati’ or ‘pouri’ (not sure on spelling). These are not cakes like ours, but more like a pancake (much thicker). Shapati is the Hindustani, Pouri in Spanish (words for bread). There was only enough food left for this widow and her son to eat and die. She went out to gather two sticks; this means a bundle of sticks, not just two, but a number of them. This is an Eastern idiom when someone refers to a larger number.
(Luke 10:35) Two. Means ‘some’; a ‘few,’ a group. Two pence—some money (Luke 10:35). Two sticks — some sticks (I Kings 17:12). Two or three gathered together—a group, maybe 200 people, not just two or three (Matthew 18:20).
‘Meal in a barrel, oil in a cruse.’ ‘Meal’ should be wheat flour. ‘Cake’ should be chappati, larger than a pancake. ‘Oil’ is needed to bake bread. ‘Two sticks’ means some sticks. To use the word ‘two’ is a figure of speech meaning ‘some.’ They could not build a fire with two sticks.
Widow feeding Elijah. There was a famine in the land. This was the last meal that the woman had.
‘Meal’ should read ‘wheat flour’ with which the bread is made. A ‘little oil’ is also needed to make bread. ‘Cake’ is chappati which is much bigger than a pancake. ‘Two sticks’ means some sticks. This is a figure where ‘two’ means ‘some.’
Verse 16 ”And the barrel of meal did not run out…’ (Translation).
 

I KINGS 18
Verse 42 To put one’s face between his knees means to have great remorse or be in deep meditation.
Face between the knees. Put his face between his knees—to do so one must sit on floor. It symbolizes deep meditation, crisis — deeply engrossed in God during crisis.
‘Put his face between his knees.’ When a man is in great remorse or deep meditation giving thanks to God, he will do this.
‘Face between his knees.’ When a man is in great remorse or deep meditation, he will place his face between his knees. Here, it was a sign of deep meditation and thanksgiving to God.
‘Put his face between his knees.’ This is a sign of very deep concentration. To learn concentration, take a large sheet of paper and place two red dots upon it. Keep your eyes fastened and open on the two red dots and keep your mind stayed on God. Your eyes will begin to water, but do not move your eyelids.
When your mind is concentrated and stayed on God, then your eyelids will not move. Your eyelids will shake when your mind is not stayed on God. A man who puts his face between his knees is in deep concentration. Bullinger says ‘cast himself down’ means kneeling and then placing forehead on the ground. Lamsa agrees with King James translation.
 

I KINGS 19
Verse 4 ‘Sat down under a Juniper tree.’ In the East, anyone who sits down under a Juniper tree is finished. He is all down in the dumps, very discouraged, he is despondent. He has come to the end of his rope. There is no more hope for him. He is ready to die. Lamsa translated this as ‘an oak tree.’ ‘Went a day’s journey into the wilderness.’ The Oriental idea of one day’s journey is 18 to 30 miles.
Verse 19 Elijah threw his mantle on Elisha; Elisha immediately left his plowing and followed Elijah.
He was called to the ministry. I Kings 19:19. When a Hindu child is 12, the priest throws a mantle on a child. That child is called to the Hindu ministry to preach.
Verses 19ff Mantle. Elijah cast his mantle on Elisha—mantle is a cloth about 4-5 feet long, 2 feet wide, and is folded into four folds. Worn around neck and falls to the knees. When a man of God calls a person to the ministry, he unfolds the mantle and throws it. He does not have to say, ‘Will you please come?’ Covering with mantle is also an assurance of redemption (Boaz and Ruth, see Orientalism in their record). When a boy is 12 years old, he is initiated into his religion by the covering of the mantle in a ceremony performed by the priest to the boy. The boy is covered with the mantle.
The tearing or rending of the mantle is an outward sign of inward anger or grief. Covering with mantle is also a sign of protection. When a person accepts the calling of the ministry, he is under the protection of God, as symbolized by the casting of the mantle on him.
After the mantle was cast on Elisha, he requested to go kiss his parents. The phrases after this were poorly translated. They should read: ‘I will not hinder thee, remember your call and come back.’
The Hindus do the ceremony with boys and the mantle and call it being twice born. (A mantle is called a stole in America.)
Verses 19 and 20 Verse 20 in the King James is a very poor translation. Elisha was plowing with 12 yoke of oxen (they were all in a single line, not a pair behind one another). Elijah threw his mantle on Elisha as he plowed and called him to the ministry. The mantle is a sign of authority. The Eastern custom was for a priest to throw his mantle upon another, and then under the mantle whisper prayers into his ear. Thus, to be born again, commissioned with authority, a mantle is rent (torn in two pieces). When one receives bad news, it is a sign of disgust, remorse or contempt. God said do not rent your garments,
but your hearts. This mantle called Elisha to the ministry. He left his oxen and went to bid his father and mother farewell. The mantle also is a sign of protection for the priest or man of God. The passage in verse 20 in its corrected form (by the converted Hindu scholars from India who translated the scriptures into their language for the English Bible Society) reads thus: ‘Let me go and kiss my father and mother goodbye.’ Then Elijah said: ‘I will not hinder you, but remember your call, and come back.’
Calling a man to a ministry.
Verse 19 ‘Twelve yoke of oxen’: They were all in a single file line and Elisha was the twelfth in line. ‘Mantle.’ When a Hindu is 12 years old, the priest will come and throw a mantle over his head and then get under it with him and whisper a mantra (prayer) in his ear. This is how they get born again (twice born). The mantle is a cloth which is folded in four, is hung on the neck and falls to the knees.
When someone hears some sad news, he will take off the mantle, unfold it, tear it into two pieces and throw it away. The mantle is used to call a man to a ministry. The mantle also means protection for the man while he is in the ministry.
The Bible was translated by the British Bar and Bible Society in India, into the Indian languages. This was done at the expense of the British. The Indian scholars did the work and were supervised by the British.
‘Go back again: for what have I done to thee.’ This should read according to Bishop’s Indian Bible—’I will not hinder you, but remember your call and come back.’
‘Cast his mantle upon him.’ Elisha was the 12th man in a line of 12 oxen. Elijah came to call him to the ministry by throwing the mantle on him.
When an Eastern boy is 12 years old, the priest will come and throw the mantle over his head. He will get under it with the boy and whisper a prayer, mantra, in his ear. The mantle is a piece of cloth which is folded in fourths and worn around the neck, hanging down to the knees. When a person is angry, he will take it off, tear it in two and then throw it away.
If a man obeys the call to the ministry, then the mantle becomes a symbol of protection for him.
Last part of verse 20: ‘Go back…’ should read—’I will not hinder you, but remember your call and come back.’
Cast his mantle—this is calling a man to a ministry.
Mantle means: 1) Call to the ministry; 2) Protection (when a person accepts the call); 3) Authority; 4) Assurance of redemption (Ruth 3); 5) Sorrow; and 6) Anger—opens mantle and tears it into two pieces, rending of the mantle.
Cast mantle: This was a call to the ministry. Sanscript—Go back—’I will not hinder you: only remember your call and come back.’
Mantle is also used for healing in India. He’ll say, ‘John Jones is healed—go thy way!’ Then he rents his mantle and he is healed.
They believe that they’re co-creators with God, because God is in them. Therefore, He can exercise His authority. Every Hindu believes he has authority, power and dominion, especially when doing good for other people. As you say it, it shall be done.
Verse 20 ‘Kiss my father and my mother.’ To the Oriental people, father and mother come first. They are taught to first respect mother, then father, then teacher, then God, then wife—if they have one.
Whenever anything happens to the son, he must first go to his mother. His mother is his refuge. The last part of this verse in quotations should read, ‘I will not hinder you, but remember your calling and come back.’ (This is because Elijah had thrown his mantle on him—symbolic of calling him to the ministry.) This is according to Bishop’s Sanscript translation. Lamsa agrees with the King James version.
 

I KINGS 20
Verse 10 The dust of Samaria shall be sufficient for handfuls for all people. This expresses
innumerable soldiers, there won’t be enough dust for all of them to even have a handful because there are too many of them. This idiom means a large number of army or following of people shall come. Benhadad said these were following him.
Handfuls of dust. An idiom is here meaning that Benhadad was going to have so many soldiers following him that if they each took a handful of dust in Samaria, there would not be enough to go around for each one of them to have a handful of dust.
‘Dust of Samaria.’ Benhadad—King of Syria. ‘To express innumerable soldiers, I will send so many soldiers that there will not be enough dust for each to pick up a handful.’ This is a figure of speech to express a great number of people.
‘Handfuls of dust.’ This is an idiom used to express innumerable soldiers. There will be so many soldiers that there will not be a handful of dust for each one. One country is so much stronger than another that they will say, ‘You don’t have enough dust for us to pick up.’
‘Handfuls for all the people.’ This is an Oriental expression which means that Benhadad will bring in more soldiers than handfuls of dust in the hands of the Samaritan people. The number of the soldiers will be greater than the particles of dust in the hands of the Samaritan people. Even if each of the people of Samaria takes a small handful of dust, the dust will not be sufficient to match the number of soldiers that will follow Benhadad. This expression represents an innumerable number of people. Lamsa translates (‘people that follow me’) this, the people who are with me. American Standard Version says,
‘the people that are at my feet.’
Verses 31 and 33 Sackcloth is the cloth of mourning made of camel’s hair or goat’s hair. Ropes on their heads is humility, surrender, submission. Once the Orientals say or call a man ‘brother’ they won’t hurt him anymore.
‘Thy brother.’ When an Easterner calls you ‘brother,’ he will never, never, never hurt you. By calling someone ‘brother’ or ‘sister,’ it settles all the differences between the two people. Don’t call someone ‘brother’ unless you mean it.
Brother. ‘Thy brother…’ means that the thing is done. King of Israel defeated the Syrian king; the Syrian king’s servants put ropes on their heads and went to see the King of Israel, and said, ‘Oh, my brother, Benhadad.’ Verse 33. ‘Thy brother’ means that the men of Israel observed the Syrians whether anything would happen. The reply, ‘thy brother,’ means that the thing is done, no more entity now, no more defeats now, no more conquerors, heroes now. Then they put him in his own chariot. All prejudices put aside. ‘By’ means ‘brother’ in India… in flesh, in spirit, in practice, in truth, in deed, in action—
brother.
Verse 32 ‘Sackcloth’ can have several different meanings. But in the context here, it means seeking for sympathy. ‘Ropes on their heads’ is a sign for seeking for mercy. The people in the East wear ropes in their headdresses as a sign that they are living in the mercy of God. Lamsa says, ‘so they put sackcloth on their head and girded ropes on their loins.’ American Standard Version agrees with the King James.
Verse 38 The ashes are symbolic of salvation and security by sacrifice.
 

I KINGS 21
Verses 2 and 3 ‘Give me thy vineyard.’ In the East, no one wants to sell his father’s inheritance. It has great sentimental value. The Orientals attach much importance to what belongs to their fathers. This is similar to a bruised reed shall he not break.
Verse 13 Here the crime is blaspheming God and the king. God and the king go together in the East. If you only blaspheme God, it is not quite so bad, but a king also—doesn’t work. Kings are appointed by God; therefore, it is a crime. Anytime they blaspheme against God, they use stones because  it was upon the tables of stone that the law was given. Therefore, if any man sins against God, or God’s law, the law, which is the stone, will deal with the man. That is their idea. So, you mustn’t use a stone in the East to bring fruit down because that is blaspheming. They use stones only to fight dogs because they think dogs
are unclean and mustn’t be touched.
Verse 21 Translation: ”Behold, I will bring evil upon thee and will destroy thy posterity and will cut off from Ahab even the dogs that urinate against the wall and him that is imprisoned and also him that is the least in Israel.’
Pisseth against the wall, ‘…and will cut off from .Ahab him that pisseth against the wall,’ should say, ‘I will take away thy prosperity and will cut off from Ahab even the dogs that urinate against the wall and him that is shut up and released in Israel.’
Verse 23 This is not an ordinary wall in a house. It is a wall that is broken down. This is where dogs usually eat what they can get a hold of in the East. If they get something, they drag it to a broken wall and eat it because if they eat it where people are living they will beat the dogs. Therefore, this woman’s body will be eaten where no human being is living. It should be ‘broken wall.’
Verse 27 ‘…and went softly….’ Should be ‘…and behaved humbly.’
Sackcloth, fasting, went softly. ‘Went softly’ means behaved humbly. Sackcloth always shows humility. When a man is humble, he is not dejected. A man can be full of believing and be humble.
When a man is in sackcloth and ashes, he is more hopeful actually, otherwise, he won’t have believing in it to wear it.
Verses 28 and 29 Humility. The moment we humble ourselves and repent, then do we receive an answer to our prayer. A dejected man has no believing at all.